Tour 2 – Summer 2014 – Day 6

Day 6 – Staying in the interior we travel across country crossing many rivers and down some interesting tracks to Hveravellir geothermal area which lies on the Kjölur plateau  between the Langjökull and Hofsjökull glaciers. It is lies at an altitude of about 600–700 metres.  After spending a late lunch we press on to Kerlingarfjöll (1,477 m (4,846 ft)) is a mountain range colourful rhyolite mountains and geothermal area.

crossing the interior to Hveravellir

crossing the interior to Hveravellir

crossing the interior to Hveravellir
crossing the interior to Hveravellir

crossing the interior to Hveravellir
Kjölur is a plateau in the highlands of Iceland, roughly defined as the area between the Langjökull and Hofsjökull glaciers. It is lies at an altitude of about 600–700 metres.
Kjölur is a plateau in the highlands of Iceland, roughly defined as the area between the Langjökull and Hofsjökull glaciers. It is lies at an altitude of about 600–700 metres.
Kjölur is a plateau in the highlands of Iceland, roughly defined as the area between the Langjökull and Hofsjökull glaciers. It is lies at an altitude of about 600–700 metres.
Kjölur is a plateau in the highlands of Iceland, roughly defined as the area between the Langjökull and Hofsjökull glaciers. It is lies at an altitude of about 600–700 metres.
Kjölur is a plateau in the highlands of Iceland, roughly defined as the area between the Langjökull and Hofsjökull glaciers. It is lies at an altitude of about 600–700 metres.
Kerlingarfjöll (1,477 m (4,846 ft)) is a mountain range in Iceland situated in the Highlands of Iceland near the Kjölur highland road. The volcanic origin of these mountains is evidenced by the numerous hot springs and rivulets in the area. And indeed, they are part of a large volcano system of 100 km2 (39 sq mi). The volcanoes of the range are tuyas.
Kerlingarfjöll (1,477 m (4,846 ft)) is a mountain range in Iceland situated in the Highlands of Iceland near the Kjölur highland road. The volcanic origin of these mountains is evidenced by the numerous hot springs and rivulets in the area. And indeed, they are part of a large volcano system of 100 km2 (39 sq mi). The volcanoes of the range are tuyas.
Kerlingarfjöll (1,477 m (4,846 ft)) is a mountain range in Iceland situated in the Highlands of Iceland near the Kjölur highland road. The volcanic origin of these mountains is evidenced by the numerous hot springs and rivulets in the area. And indeed, they are part of a large volcano system of 100 km2 (39 sq mi). The volcanoes of the range are tuyas.
Kerlingarfjöll (1,477 m (4,846 ft)) is a mountain range in Iceland situated in the Highlands of Iceland near the Kjölur highland road. The volcanic origin of these mountains is evidenced by the numerous hot springs and rivulets in the area. And indeed, they are part of a large volcano system of 100 km2 (39 sq mi). The volcanoes of the range are tuyas.

Tour 2 – Summer 2014 – Day 5

Day 5: Relaxing morning looking around Akureyri and picking up supplies before we head off back into the interior.  3 days supply required.  Leaving Akureyri just after lunch we head toward Laugafell where there is a geothermal pool for an evening dip looking over to Hofsjökull.  The journey to Laugafell is through an amazing glaciated valley and takes the full afternoon.

Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell
Route to Laugafell

 

Tour 2 – Summer 2014 – Day 4

Day 4 – Whale watching morning – followed by wonderful fish & chips.  Then an afternoon of waterfalls whilst making our way to Akureyri, nicknamed the Capital of North Iceland, Akureyri is an important port and fishing centre, with a population of 17,754.

The waterfalls along Skjálfandafljót river –  2 of the main ones are Godafoss, the waterfall of the gods.  Aldeyjarfoss waterfall at the northern part of the Sprengisandur highland road.

An evening and following morning are spent within Akureyri, supplies are collected for 3 days.

Whale watching Husavik
Whale watching Husavik
Whale watching Husavik
Whale watching Husavik
Whale watching Husavik
Whale watching Husavik
Skjálfandafljót River
Skjálfandafljót River
The Goðafoss (Icelandic: waterfall of the gods or waterfall of the goði) is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in Iceland. It is located in the Bárðardalur district of North-Central Iceland at the beginning of the Sprengisandur highland road. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 meters over a width of 30 meters.   In the year 999 or 1000 the Lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. After his conversion it is said that upon returning from the Alþingi, Þorgeir threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall. Þorgeir's story is preserved in Ari Þorgilsson's Íslendingabók.
The Goðafoss (Icelandic: waterfall of the gods or waterfall of the goði) is one of the most spectacular waterfalls in Iceland. It is located in the Bárðardalur district of North-Central Iceland at the beginning of the Sprengisandur highland road. The water of the river Skjálfandafljót falls from a height of 12 meters over a width of 30 meters.
In the year 999 or 1000 the Lawspeaker Þorgeir Ljósvetningagoði made Christianity the official religion of Iceland. After his conversion it is said that upon returning from the Alþingi, Þorgeir threw his statues of the Norse gods into the waterfall. Þorgeir’s story is preserved in Ari Þorgilsson’s Íslendingabók.
Skjálfandafljót Fossar
Skjálfandafljót Fossar
Skjálfandafljót Fossar
Skjálfandafljót Fossar
Aldeyjarfoss waterfall
Aldeyjarfoss waterfall
Akureyri
Akureyri

 

Tour 2 – Summer 2014 – Day 3

Day 3 – Less driving today, more about seeing the sights around Myvatn.  The Myvatn means midge lake – we have been lucky and not had too much of a problem with our tours but I do recommend head nets, we have been here when it is absolutely awful – you just need a breeze.  There are many many areas to visit in this area we cover many of them but there are still more.

Grjótagjá Game of Thrones fans may recognise it as the place where John Snow is deflowered by Ygritte. Grjótagjá is a gaping fissure with a 45°C water-filled cave. Dettifoss & Selfoss waterfalls.  Leirhnjúkur & Krafla’s  volcanic area. Hverir  landscape of mud cauldrons, steaming vents, radiant mineral deposits and piping fumaroles.  Evenings adventure to a line of craters.

Game of Thrones fans may recognise it as the place where John Snow is deflowered by Ygritte. Grjótagjá is a gaping fissure with a 45°C water-filled cave. It's on private property – it's prohibited to bathe here, but the owners allow the public to visit and photograph. It’s a beautiful spot, particularly when the sun filters through the cracks in the roof and illuminates the interior.
Game of Thrones fans may recognise it as the place where John Snow is deflowered by Ygritte. Grjótagjá is a gaping fissure with a 45°C water-filled cave. It’s on private property – it’s prohibited to bathe here, but the owners allow the public to visit and photograph. It’s a beautiful spot, particularly when the sun filters through the cracks in the roof and illuminates the interior.
Game of Thrones fans may recognise it as the place where John Snow is deflowered by Ygritte. Grjótagjá is a gaping fissure with a 45°C water-filled cave. It's on private property – it's prohibited to bathe here, but the owners allow the public to visit and photograph. It’s a beautiful spot, particularly when the sun filters through the cracks in the roof and illuminates the interior.
Game of Thrones fans may recognise it as the place where John Snow is deflowered by Ygritte. Grjótagjá is a gaping fissure with a 45°C water-filled cave. It’s on private property – it’s prohibited to bathe here, but the owners allow the public to visit and photograph. It’s a beautiful spot, particularly when the sun filters through the cracks in the roof and illuminates the interior.
The magical, ochre-toned world of Hverir is a lunar-like landscape of mud cauldrons, steaming vents, radiant mineral deposits and piping fumaroles. Belching mudflaps and the powerful stench of sulphur may not sound enticing, but Hverir’s ethereal allure grips every passer-by.
The magical, ochre-toned world of Hverir is a lunar-like landscape of mud cauldrons, steaming vents, radiant mineral deposits and piping fumaroles. Belching mudflaps and the powerful stench of sulphur may not sound enticing, but Hverir’s ethereal allure grips every passer-by.
The magical, ochre-toned world of Hverir is a lunar-like landscape of mud cauldrons, steaming vents, radiant mineral deposits and piping fumaroles. Belching mudflaps and the powerful stench of sulphur may not sound enticing, but Hverir’s ethereal allure grips every passer-by.
The magical, ochre-toned world of Hverir is a lunar-like landscape of mud cauldrons, steaming vents, radiant mineral deposits and piping fumaroles. Belching mudflaps and the powerful stench of sulphur may not sound enticing, but Hverir’s ethereal allure grips every passer-by.
Dettifoss is situated on the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river, which flows from the Vatnajökull glacier and collects water from a large area in Northeast Iceland.
Dettifoss is situated on the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river, which flows from the Vatnajökull glacier and collects water from a large area in Northeast Iceland.
Dettifoss is situated on the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river, which flows from the Vatnajökull glacier and collects water from a large area in Northeast Iceland.
Dettifoss is situated on the Jökulsá á Fjöllum river, which flows from the Vatnajökull glacier and collects water from a large area in Northeast Iceland.
Selfoss is a waterfall in the river Jökulsá á Fjöllum in the north of Iceland which drops over some waterfalls about 30 km before flowing into Öxarfjörður, a bay of the Arctic Sea
Selfoss is a waterfall in the river Jökulsá á Fjöllum in the north of Iceland which drops over some waterfalls about 30 km before flowing into Öxarfjörður, a bay of the Arctic Sea
Krafla is a caldera of about 10 km in diameter with a 90 km long fissure zone
Krafla is a caldera of about 10 km in diameter with a 90 km long fissure zone
The Leirhnjúkur is an active volcano in Iceland within the krafla caldera
The Leirhnjúkur is an active volcano in Iceland within the krafla caldera
Crater Adventure
Crater Adventure

Tour 2 – Summer 2014 – Day 2

Day 2: Heading away from the glacier Kverkfjoll towards Askja.  There had been a huge landslide a few days before and it was just being reopened today.  We stop for a break at the Jökulsá á Fjöllum glacial river then press on to Askja.  There is still a large amount of snow when we arrive. The sun is shining we take our lunch and head across the snow to the little viti and Oskjavatn lake within the caldera.  Öskjuvatn is a large lake that fills much of the smaller caldera resulting from the 1875 eruption. After spending sometime at Askja we head past Herðubreið  in the midst of the Ódáðahraun desert and arrive at Myvatn where we camp.  In the evening we visit the Myvatn version of the blue lagoon to relax in the beautiful blue geothermal water.

The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
Lava field within the interior of Iceland
Lava field within the interior of Iceland
Jökulsá á Fjöllum is the second longest river in Iceland (206 km). Its source is the Vatnajökull glacier. It flows into the Greenland Sea. Jökulsá á Fjöllum streams over the waterfalls Selfoss, Dettifoss, and Hafragilsfoss, the second of which is the most powerful waterfall in Europe
Jökulsá á Fjöllum is the second longest river in Iceland (206 km). Its source is the Vatnajökull glacier. It flows into the Greenland Sea. Jökulsá á Fjöllum streams over the waterfalls Selfoss, Dettifoss, and Hafragilsfoss, the second of which is the most powerful waterfall in Europe
Jökulsá á Fjöllum is the second longest river in Iceland (206 km). Its source is the Vatnajökull glacier. It flows into the Greenland Sea. Jökulsá á Fjöllum streams over the waterfalls Selfoss, Dettifoss, and Hafragilsfoss, the second of which is the most powerful waterfall in Europe
Jökulsá á Fjöllum is the second longest river in Iceland (206 km). Its source is the Vatnajökull glacier. It flows into the Greenland Sea. Jökulsá á Fjöllum streams over the waterfalls Selfoss, Dettifoss, and Hafragilsfoss, the second of which is the most powerful waterfall in Europe
Ódáðahraun desert
Ódáðahraun desert
Askja refers to a complex of nested calderas within the surrounding Dyngjufjöll mountains, which rise to 1,510 m (4,954 ft), askja meaning box or caldera in Icelandic
Askja refers to a complex of nested calderas within the surrounding Dyngjufjöll mountains, which rise to 1,510 m (4,954 ft), askja meaning box or caldera in Icelandic
Askja refers to a complex of nested calderas within the surrounding Dyngjufjöll mountains, which rise to 1,510 m (4,954 ft), askja meaning box or caldera in Icelandic
Askja refers to a complex of nested calderas within the surrounding Dyngjufjöll mountains, which rise to 1,510 m (4,954 ft), askja meaning box or caldera in Icelandic
Ódáðahraun desert
Ódáðahraun desert
Linda River F88
Linda River F88
Lava Field F88
Lava Field F88
Returning to camp after Myvatn Baths
Returning to camp after Myvatn Baths

Tour 2 – Summer 2014 – Day 1

Tour 2: 2014 – Starting Day 1 – arriving on the ferry – quick supermarket stop for supplies – getting off tarmac as soon as possible – going through to the interior for the first nights camp and a trip to the glacier and ice caves in the evening. Along the way we stop at one of Iceland’s remotest villages, a glacial river and a beautiful waterfall. Staying in a remote campsite.

Waterfall Iceland
North Iceland on tour with venture 4×4
Heading into the interior with venture 4x4
Heading into the interior
bikers crossing river
bikers crossing river
heading to the interior Iceland
heading to the interior Iceland
Kreppa
Kreppa
lava fields
lava fields
Ódáðahraun desert
Ódáðahraun desert
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.
The mountain range Kverkfjöll (1,764 m) is situated on the north-eastern border of the glacier Vatnajökull in Iceland.